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Carina Johnson (Pitzer College)

"Portraits of Erasure: the Extra-European Subject in Sixteenth-Century Europe"

Carina L. Johnson is Professor of History at Pitzer College and Extended Faculty at Claremont Graduate University.  A Habsburg cultural historian, she is the author of Cultural Hierarchy in Sixteenth-Century Europe: The Ottomans and Mexicans (Cambridge University Press, 2011) and articles on proto-ethnography, cross-cultural material exchange, and early modern empire.  

Her current research projects investigate the history of identity markers prior to biological race and a study exploring homefront experiences of the Ottoman-Habsburg hot and cold wars in the Holy Roman Empire, ca. 1480-1630.

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Catherine Molineux (Vanderbilt University)

“Self-Emancipation: Ayuba Suleiman Diallo and the Atlantic Performance of Muslim African History” 

Catherine Molineux,  Associate Professor of History, Chancellor Faculty Fellow, Director of Graduate Studies, Vanderbilt University, is a cultural historian of the British Atlantic world, with a specialty in slavery, race, and visual studies.

 

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Cécile Fromont (University of Chicago)

"Bodies of Ink in Worlds of Paper: Authors and Subjects in Early Modern Central Africa"

Cécile Fromont is an assistant professor in Art History and the College at the University of Chicago focusing on the visual, material, and religious culture of Africa and Latin America with a special emphasis on the early modern period (ca 1500-1800) and on the Portuguese-speaking Atlantic World. Cécile’s first book, The Art of Conversion: Christian Visual Culture in the Kingdom of Kongo was published in 2014 by the University of North Carolina Press for the Omohundro Institute for Early American History. It won a College Art Association Millard Meiss Publication Fund Grant, was named the American Academy of Religion's 2015 Best First Book in the History of Religions, received the 2015 Albert J. Raboteau Book Prize for the Best Book in Africana Religions, and an honorable mention for the 2015 Melville J. Herskovits Award of the African Studies Association.